Moving mountains by controlling your thoughts

March 13, 2016

 

Being caught in digital distraction?

… detach, observe and refresh!

 

Being stuck in the urge for distraction zaps energy,

bears the risk of thoughtless choices and

deprives us of finding innovative solutions.

 

We need our thinking clean and simple.

 

Thought is the process of creating our world: technological and cultural answers

to our challenges. And … of changing our thinking itself. 

 

 

TRAINING TO THINK

Taking time for just thinking is so important that researchers are engaging to understand what how to disengage the mind - relaxing - and how to put the mind on task - thinking. Thinking in various ways like analyzing, structuring, creating ideas, finding pitfalls, evaluating the bright sides as well as the emotional aspects. 

 

Psychologist Timothy Wilson is among several researchers who studied how we xperience being alone with nothing but thoughts. 

“The mind is designed to engage with the world,” he states. “Even when we are by ourselves, our focus usually is on the outside world. And without training in meditation or thought-control techniques most of the participants in his study would prefer to engage in an unpleasant activity than to concentrate on their thoughts."

To read the whole article click here >> "Doing something is better than doing nothing for most people, study shows" by Fariss Samarrai

 

“Those of us who enjoy some down time to just think likely find the results of this study surprising – I certainly do – but our study participants consistently demonstrated that they would rather have something to do than to have nothing other than their thoughts for even a fairly brief period of time,” Wilson said.

 

 

RATHER SEEKING DISTRACTION

In his paper, Wilson notes that broad surveys have shown that people generally prefer not to disengage from the world, and, when they do, they do not particularly enjoy it. Based on these surveys, Americans spent their time watching television, socializing or reading, and actually spent little or no time “relaxing or thinking.”

 

During several of Wilson’s experiments, participants were asked to sit alone in an unadorned room at a laboratory with no cell phone, reading materials or writing implements, and to spend six to 15 minutes – depending on the study – entertaining themselves with their thoughts. Afterward, they answered questions about how much they enjoyed the experience and if they had difficulty concentrating, among other questions.

 

 

MIND WANDERING

Most reported they found it difficult to concentrate and that their minds wandered, though nothing was competing for their attention. On average the participants did not enjoy the experience. A similar result was found in further studies when the participants were allowed to spend time alone with their thoughts in their homes.

 

“We found that about a third admitted that they had ‘cheated’ at home by engaging in some activity, such as listening to music or using a cell phone, or leaving their chair,” Wilson said. “And they didn’t enjoy this experience any more at home than at the lab.”

 

During several of Wilson’s experiments, participants were asked to sit alone in an unadorned room at a laboratory with no cell phone, reading materials or writing implements, and to spend six to 15 minutes – depending on the study – entertaining themselves with their thoughts. Afterward, they answered questions about how much they enjoyed the experience and if they had difficulty concentrating, among other questions.

 

...

 

Most reported they found it difficult to concentrate and that their minds wandered, though nothing was competing for their attention. On average the participants did not enjoy the experience. A similar result was found in further studies when the participants were allowed to spend time alone with their thoughts in their homes.

 

“We found that about a third admitted that they had ‘cheated’ at home by engaging in some activity, such as listening to music or using a cell phone, or leaving their chair,” Wilson said. “And they didn’t enjoy this experience any more at home than at the lab.”

 

...

 

The researchers took their studies further. Because most people prefer having something to do rather than just thinking, they then asked, “Would they rather do an unpleasant activity than no activity at all?”

 

The results show that many would. Participants were given the same circumstances as most of the previous studies, with the added option of also administering a mild electric shock to themselves by pressing a button.

 

To read the whole article click here >> "Doing something is better than doing nothing for most people, study shows" by Fariss Samarrai

 

 

©Katharina Mullen – BeVital.eu

 

 

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Resilient & Vigorous People are Vital to Organisations.  

      Such people can be relied upon to effectively create solutions -
      without depleting their energy in the face of a demanding day
.

      They know how to regain their focus and optimise their performance.     

Katharina Mullen - managing director BeVital

katharina.mullen@bevital.eu